Inside the tomb of the emperor

2017-5-22 18:39| 发布者: 武子| 查看: 453| 评论: 0|原作者: Zhao Xu|来自: ChinaDaily

摘要: Sixty one years have passed, but Sun Xianbao well remembers exactly what he saw aftersqueezing himself through the narrow opening between two giant stone panels, panels that formthe gate to the burial chamber of Emperor Wanli (1563-1620).


Archaeologists recording what they saw inside the Dingling Mausoleum's underground tomb in 1957. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Sixty one years have passedbut Sun Xianbao well remembers exactly what he saw aftersqueezing himself through the narrow opening between two giant stone panelspanels that formthe gate to the burial chamber of Emperor Wanli (1563-1620).

"On the ground were rotted wooden boards and some whitish circles," the 80-year-old says.

"The circlesit turned outwere the paper coins meant for the deceasedTime had turned thepaper into grainy dust."

In 1957, from where he stoodinside the tombSun removed a rectangular stone slab that hadleaned against the panels and served as lock for 337 years.

Now the gate leading to the final resting place for the longest-reigning emperor of China's MingDynasty (1368-1644) was finally opened.


The opening of the Impregnable WallThe man on top of the left ladder is ZhaoQichang. [Photo provided to China Daily]

In the late 1980s Yang, together with Yue Nan, a historian, wrote the book Wind and Snow atDingling (feng xue ding ling), a vivid recount of the entire excavation process.

In the 1950s, when some leading historians and archaeologists in China decided to excavate animperial tomb from the Ming Dynasty for researchDingling (1368-1644) was not even near thetop of the listYang says.

"They initially focused on other tombstombs either belonging to a historically more importantMing Emperor or standing the chance of housing crucial informationimperial tomes forexample."


Archaeologists clearing the coffins at Dingling Mausoleum. [Photo provided toChina Daily]

They Hardly had the excavation team got down to work, than they realized they faced a giantconundrum, the answer to which the designers and builders of the mausoleums had triedeverything to hide. With no clues yielded by the ground of the tombs they were aiming for,frustrated members eventually decided to focus on any mausoleum that might give them a tip-off. That was when someone noticed a caved-in section on a wall surrounding the circularground that constitutes the second half of the mausoleum's design.

The entire layout of the mausoleum is split in twoa rectangular part at the front and a circularpart at the backseparated by a stone tower known as ming louor the Worldly TowerThedifferent shapes were meant to represent Earth and Heavenbelieved by ancient Chinese to bein a square and a circle respectively.


Inside Emperor Wanli's underground tomb. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The broken wall might be the placeAnd rememberthis was in May 1956.

"The bricks had gone and there was a big hole about half a meter in diameter," Yang says. "Since it was three meters above the groundthe team members had to set up a human ladderto reach the hole and take a peek insideIt was a peek that would change the contemporaryhistory of the Dingling Mausoleum."

The rim of the hole appears to its examiners like the upper edge of an arched gatePeekinginsidethe man at the top of the human ladder also glimpsed brick marksmarks left on earthindicating the previous existence of bricksWhat according to some villagers had been a hidingplace for local bandits reminded the archaeologists of the entrance to a secret tunnel.


Digging out Dingling. [Photo by Zhang Wei/China Daily]

Difficult quest

So they began diggingTwo hours latera stone stele was unearthed bearing the characters suidao menor tunnel gateTen days lateras the team arrived at 4.2 meters undergroundtheydiscovered brick walls on both sides of an 8-meter-wide path that ran along the circular wall ofthe Treasure CityIn retrospectthe pathcalled "the brick tunnelwas the route the colossalcoffins of the emperor and his two empresses traveled after their arrival at the mausoleum.

Howevera promising beginning did not lead to a quick endingAfter digging for months andfinding nothingthe team jumped ahead and dug more along that same routebut still foundnothing.

"It seemed that they had assiduously followed this clue that rolled out before them like threadfrom a skeinonly to arrive at the end and find nothing but the end of the threadIt was in July andAugustwith rainwater constantly filling the trenchYet just when most people were about to giveupthe emperorif you likesent another beckoning."


[Photo provided to China Daily]

Today the stelelying in a glass cabinet in one of the two exhibition halls of the mausoleumispresented by tour guides to visitors as "the key of Dingling". And the wall mentioned is the onethat separates the burial chambers of the emperor with the tunnel that leads to it.

"Elated by the new findthe team started digging its third and last tunnel from where the secondstele was foundat the back of the Worldly TowersNot long into diggingthey discoveredanother tunnelnot a brick one but a much sturdier stone one that ran toward the center of theburial mound.

"It's clear now that the stone tunnel constitutes the last section of the journey taken by EmperorWanli and his empresses en route to their final resting place," Yang says. "The team could notfind the stone tunnel initially because there is a turn between the brick tunnel and this stone one."

At the end of this 40-meter long tunnel lies "the wall", called jin gang qiangor "the impregnablewall". Made of big stone blocksthe wall indeed seems impregnable until the archaeologistsrealized that the central part of it could be easily dismantledby pulling out the blocks of which itis composedone by onelike pulling drawers from a chest.

[Photo provided to China Daily]

"There was a clear puffaccompanied by a plume of dark smokeThe airtrapped inside formore than three centuries and thick with the smell of moldcharged out.

Wearing a face mask and with a rope tied to his waistZhaofresh from the ArchaeologyDepartment of Peking Universitywas the first to get in.

"The sleeves and both parts of his trousers were sealed tightly so no noxious air could enter,"Sun says.

When Zhao arrived at the stone gate standing right behind the wallit was closedUnder the lightof an electric torchhe discerned a narrow opening in between the two stone panelsPressinghimself against that openinghe could see a huge rectangular stone slab leaning against thepanels from inside the chamberIt was a locka firm oneanyone who wished to enter theforbidden ground needed to find a way to remove the stonefrom the outside.


[Photo provided to China Daily]

"He fashioned the wires into a half circle with a long handle and then gradually put that circlethrough the openingnoosed the stone slab on the top and pushed," says Yangwho has lived ina retirement home in suburban Beijing since her husband died at the age of 84 in 2010.

"The upper edge of the stone slabthe part that was in contact with the gatewas slightly liftedbackwardso the gate could be pushed open just a little bit," she says.

A little bit indeedbut big enough for Sunback then a thin 18-year-oldto squeeze through.

That was in May 1957. A year had passed from when the team members had dug out their firstshovel of dirt.


[Photo provided to China Daily]

Lost treasures

Three months after that the archaeologists opened the wooden coffins of the emperor and histwo empressescoffins that had lain in the innermost room of this five-room burial chamber.Some parts of the coffins had rotted awayor even collapsedAnd the corpses had long beenreduced to bonesBut what was found inside the coffinsincluding brocaded fabrics andaccessories made of silvergold and jadestunned the archaeological world in China andbeyond.

Howeverdue to a lack of adequate conservation methodsmany precious objectsfabrics inparticularwere exposed to the air and suffered irreversible damages.

"The luster retained for centuries thanks to the lack of oxygen inside the tomb was lost forever,"says Yangwho married Zhao in the winter of 1957, a few months after the excavation wascompleted.


[Photo provided to China Daily]

"The loss was genuinely mourned by everyone who had taken part in the excavation."

In factin 1956, before digging startedopinions had been divided on whether it should goaheadThose who opposed it warned of the significance of the task and the gravity of the matterif anything went wrong.

But eventuallyZhou Enlaithe Chinese premiergave the nodAfter the warning had turned atleast partly into realityZhoupetitioned by a group of saddened archaeologistsruled that therewould be no further excavation of any imperial tombneither in his lifetime nor before theChinese archaeological world was become fully preparedThat decree still holds power today.


飘过

用心

有用

点赞

无趣

同来源文章