Ming tombs security tightened after imperial mausoleum theft

2017-4-14 12:04| Editor: 武子| view: 99| comment: 0|Author: By Kou Jie|Source: en.people.cn

Summaryuuuuuu: Local authorities in Beijing have beefed up security for the Ming imperial tombs afterseveral cultural relics were reported missing in March, an incident that reveals the laxity ofChina’s historic preservation efforts.

Local authorities in Beijing have beefed up security for the Ming imperial tombs afterseveral cultural relics were reported missing in Marchan incident that reveals the laxity ofChinas historic preservation efforts.

Due to the recent theftsecurity measures have been upgraded in the tombs and theirsurrounding areasFor instancewe used to offer guests special permission to explore sometombs that are not usually open to the publicbut that practice has now been suspended,”an employee of the Ming Tombs Special Administration told the Peoples Daily Online.

The new measures come after media outlets reported the theft of a pair of 400-year-oldcandle holders in MarchAccording to Xinhua News Agencythe missing white marblecandle holders were placed in front of the mausoleum of the Ming Dynastys last emperor,Chongzhenand went missing last MayHoweverlocal officials decided not to report theincident at that timeinstead falsely asserting that the cultural relics had been sent forrepair.

The missing candle holders have since been retrieved by policeThree suspects werearrested for the theftwhile four officials were let go for “incompetence in the protection ofcultural relics.”

The theft from the Ming tombsa historical site protected at the national levelshows thecountrys incompetence in protecting cultural relicsThere are countless cultural andhistorical sites in China that suffer from vandalism and even lootingTheir protection so farhas not been promising,” Liu Mengci (pseudonym), a Beijing-based volunteer for culturalrelic protectiontold the Peoples Daily Online.

Located in the northern part of Beijingthe Ming tombs are a collection of 13 royalmausoleumsand are designated as one component of a larger World Heritage Site.Presentlyonly three mausoleums out of the 13 are open to the public.

Lax protection of cultural relics

As a history loverI have been conducting research on the protection of the Ming Tombsfor several yearsBased on my observationsthe tombs’ protection seems laxdespiteauthorities’ best efforts,” said LiuAccording to Liusome of the tombs are protected onlyby a small crew of guardsWhat's morethe guards frequently lack professional knowledgeabout the protection of cultural relics.

Most people have no access to the tombsother than the three tombs that are open to thepublicThough it's not common practiceyou may be allowed to have a peek inside theclosed tombs if you offer the guards some small gifts - for instancea pack of cigarettes,”said Liu.

A guard at Qing Tombone of the closed Ming tombsconcurredtelling Beijing Youth Dailythat even if there are regulations preventing visitors from entering the closed tombssometravelers may still sneak inas the security isn't very tight.

But after the theftsuch practices have been completely banned for security reasons,” theguard emphasized.

The closed tombs are located in desolate and distant regionsmaking it even harder toprotect themIf the media had not reported on the missing candle holderswe might neverhave known about the theft,” said Liu.

According to an announcement released by the State Administration of Cultural Relicsthesecurity facilities of the tomb from which the holders were stolen were completelyparalyzed when the incident occurredAt the same timelocal authorities concealed thetruth and failed to report the theft in a timely fashionwhich also served to expose theloopholes and weak spots of cultural relic protection.

Public donation as a new method of protection

The candle holder theft is merely the most recent in a series of theftsAt least 12 ancientfrescoes were stolen from temples in Shanxi province in 2016, and many still lack propercare and maintenanceaccording to Beijing Youth Daily.

Insufficient funds are a major factor hindering Chinas cultural relic protectionAccordingto the Beijing TimesChina spent over 31 billion RMB from 2011 to 2015 in an effort toprotect 10,000 historical sites nationwidebut the number of China's cultural relics thatare urgently in need of protection is closer to 200,000.

Some ancient temples in Shanxifor instancedon't even have basic security measures likecameras or alarm systemsThere may be only one guard to protect the whole building,”said LiuHe believes that raising funds from the public might help to promote cultural relicprotection.

The project to repair the Forbidden Citys Hall of Mental Cultivation received 220 millionRMB in contributions from the publicThis serves as a good model for Chinas futurecultural relics protectionthe Beijing Times reported.  


点赞

有用

用心

飘过

无趣